About John E. Jaqua Academic Center

The John E. Jaqua Center for Student Athletes at the University of Oregon explores the limits of transparency and connectivity to provide the UO's student-athletes a place to gather as a community focused on study and learning. The challenge of creating a tranquil environment where students feel connected to natural landscape elements and daylight was heightened by the chosen location: a busy intersection between campus and the city of Eugene, on the site of a former parking lot at one of the major campus entrances."The Jaqua Center," as it has become known, uses a series of creative innovations in the design of the building envelope and the surrounding landscaping in support of resolving the challenges of the site, all while addressing and leveraging opportunities within existing state energy policies and state regulations.

The facility is the result of a generous gift from Phil and Penny Knight to encourage academic achievement along with athletic performance. The building is named after John E. Jaqua, who was a varsity athlete at Pomona College, war hero, adored father/grandfather and longtime supporter of the University of Oregon. Jaqua's legacy is meant to awaken every generation to look itself in the eye and be the best it can be, and his namesake represents a challenge to student-athletes to fulfill their promise. Donor recognition in the facility is subtly treated, as names are etched into glass on an entry wall panel.

Donor

The facility is the result of a generous gift from Phil and Penny Knight to encourage academic achievement along with athletic performance. The building is named after John E. Jaqua, who was a varsity athlete at Pomona College, war hero, adored father/grandfather and longtime supporter of the University of Oregon. Jaqua’s legacy is meant to awaken every generation to look itself in the eye and be the best it can be, and his namesake represents a challenge to student-athletes to fulfill their promise. Donor recognition in the facility is subtly treated, as names are etched into glass on an entry wall panel.